Nos tutelles

CNRS Université de Toulouse

 

Le réseau des MSH

Réseau national des MSH

Rechercher



Langue            

Réseaux sociaux

Actualités Appels à Projets


Téléchargez la dernière Newsletter
du Service Partenariat et Valorisation
de la MSHS-T :






Accueil du site > Accueil > Actualités

Spring Symposium FACE AND EMOTION PROCESSING IN THE BRAIN

16 AVRIL 2019

Spring Symposium FACE AND EMOTION PROCESSING IN THE BRAIN

MARDI 16 AVRIL 2019
à 8h45

CERVEAU & COGNITION

SALLE DES CONFERENCES

PAVILLON BAUDOT

CHU PURPAN


Le programme




  • Olivier PASCALIS, LNPC Grenoble
    On the Linkage between Face Processing, Language Processing, and Narrowing during Development

From the beginning of life, face and language processing are crucial for establishing social communication.
Studies on the development of systems for processing faces and language have yielded such similarities as perceptual narrowing across both domains. In this talk, I will review several functions of human communication, and then describe how the tools used to accomplish those functions are modified by perceptual narrowing. I will conclude that narrowing is common to all forms of social communication. I will argue that during evolution, social communication engaged different perceptual and cognitive systems—face, facial expression, gesture, vocalization, sound, and oral language—that emerged at different times. These systems are interactive and linked to some extent. In this framework, narrowing can be viewed as a way infants adapt to their native social group.

  • Astrid HOPFENSITZ , IAST Toulouse
    The strategic display of emotions

The emotions that someone expresses has consequences for how that person is treated. We study whether people display emotions strategically. In two laboratory experiments, participants play task delegation games in which managers assign a task to one of two workers. When assigning the task, managers see pictures of the workers and we vary whether getting the task is desirable or not. We find that workers strategically adapt their emotional expressions to the incentives they face, and that it indeed pays off to do so. Yet, workers do not exploit the full potential of the strategic display of emotions.

  • Nathalie GEORGE, ICM Paris
    Dynamics of electrophysiological responses to face, gaze, and emotion in the human occipito-temporal cortex

Abstract : Faces are key social stimuli that convey information about others’ attentional direction, emotion, and more generally mental states, through changes in direction of gaze and emotional expression. While fMRI and PET studies have allowed the distributed architecture of the face processing network to be revealed, the knowledge on the temporal unfolding of the processing of face, gaze, and emotion is still sparse. Here, I will present a study where we used intracerebral EEG to tackle this issue. This study reveals that the temporal sequence of brain responses to faces across the occipito-temporal visual pathway depends on the input stimulus and shows a striking selectivity of the superior temporal sulcus responses to gaze movement.

  • Leila REDDY, CerCo Toulouse
    Reconstructing Faces from fMRI Patterns using Deep Generative Neural Networks.

While objects from different categories can be reliably decoded from fMRI brain response patterns, it has proved more difficult to distinguish visually similar inputs, such as different faces. Here, we apply a recently developed deep learning system to the reconstruction of face images from human fMRI patterns. We obtained >95% correct decoding performance for pairwise discrimination of human faces. This technique also allowed for accurate decoding of the gender of a face, or which face was imagined by the subject. We hypothesize that the latent space of modern deep learning generative models could serve as a valid approximation for human brain representations.